Impulse buy πŸ€—

Oh I am so excited to share this post with you. In December I had no sewing machines. Then at Christmas Sissy arrived.

Now, sissy has an older sibling! Welcome to serenity! Hopefully sissy won’t get too upset, she’s still the baby after all!

This came about when I went into a local antiques and vintage store and saw this beauty sitting on the side.

How could I resist??? Do you blame me???

She stayed in the shop last night so we could go and pick her up in the car today.

This afternoon I was going to have a rest but then I decided to find out if she really worked!!

Several you tube videos later and I had succeeded in winding the bobbin and loading it into the shuttle, and I had threaded the main thread. I played around with a scrap of material, quickly discovered you can’t go backwards with a hand crank but have to turn the work so you can oversew it.

Then I made this spring weight infinity scarf for my niece using the flamingo materials she had sent me. I fear it may be too long for her but I think she’ll enjoy it anyway!

Look at this lovely stitching!

I’m loving having a piece of history in my home, especially one so beautiful. I’ve put her to bed under her cover but it seems a shame to hide her really.

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32 thoughts on “Impulse buy πŸ€—”

  1. oh Julia, I am so jealous!!!
    Have you read “The Sewing Machine” by Natalie Fergie? If you haven’t, you really must look out for it . . . a story based on the lives of several gΓ©nΓ©rations of people who all sew on a Singer 99K (which looks like what you’ve just bought.

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    1. I have read it, and would probably not have bought serenity had I not read it! I have no idea of her history, but she did come with some old cotton rΓ©els. And I think she was made in 1959.

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    2. I loved the book by the way… And passed it on to someone else to read too. It was exciting to discover ‘unbound’ as a publishing company too, and I’ve helped fund two publications since discovering it which is very cool 😊

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  2. The cover is beautiful too! She is a beauty. I have a very old machine too. I actually forgot I had her as I’m so use to seeing the case. Looks a bit like a suitcase. I’m very impressed with yours and of course you couldn’t resist her. Well done with your scarf, it’s very pretty πŸ™‚ β€πŸ’›πŸ’œβ€πŸ’›πŸ’œβ€

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    1. Thank you. I’m pleased with how the scarf turned out even if it is a bit long! I’m really pleased with the condition of the case and serenity herself, given some of the ones I’ve seen on line.

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  3. The singer machines are so lovely. We used to have one exactly the same as this at home when I was younger and then a bigger one complete with table at a place I worked in years ago. So solidly built – I’m not surprised that it still works.

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  4. Oh, Julia, she’s gorgeous! I came across one recently, but it was out of my price range. I do have a machine from the 70s, I think, and I need to start carving out time to learn how it works so I can start sewing again. I can’t wait to see what you make with your new friend.

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    1. I think I was lucky with a reasonably low price, which meant I gave into temptation! I found you tube videos really helpful, once you put in specifics about what you need eg long bobbin vs short bobbin, hand crank vs treadle etc.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I have started pulling all of my fabric stash and supplies out into the guest room, so hopefully I can be sewing by the end of summer.
        I look forward to seeing your next project!

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    1. That’s very cool to know it was your grandmother’s. I’m not sure how often I’ll use mine… I think it will depend on my mood and on what I’m planning to make… And whether I can get replacement needles for it!

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  5. Absolutely beautiful. It sure brings back memories of how I learned to sew. The first sewing machine I used was a hand crank, but not as pretty as this one. Then my grandmother taught me on a machine that had a manual peddle beneath it in a cabinet. πŸ™‚
    Wonderful to see yours and still in its own cover too. πŸ™‚
    Well done!!

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  6. Oh Julia, your machine is beautiful. The first thing I thought of was the book you sent me. I never did let you know that I read it as soon as I got it! I have been planning to do a post on that but life has just gotten in the way!
    I love that you sewed something with it. I would have had to give it a go also.
    I have a singer treadle sewing machine from my grandma on my dad’s side. The belt is broke and I have a new one but have never put it together…..I may have to do that one of these days and see if I can make that machine work again. I remember my grandma fixing jeans on that old Singer.

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  7. Oh she’s beautiful – how could you possibly resist! It’s such a shame they don’t make things like they used to, although being able to go backwards (and all the other fancy things) is a plus for the modern machines. If you could just combine the two that would be perfect

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    1. I love her.. She’s very cool, and although going backwards would be handy, it’s not too tricky to turn your work and sew over the stitches… Plus I wonder if my stitching is more secure because it’s easier to do this part slowly and make sure I sew over the stitches

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